3 Weeks Junior Paediatrics Posting in Osogbo

First of all, hello! It’s been quite some time hasn’t it? I’ve missed hanging out here. I have no valid excuse for being away for so long, all I can only offer you are my sincere apologies and a promise to make it up to you.


Moving on to Paeds Osogbo;


Let me be frank, it was hell. Not like I know what hell is like but if there was ever a hell on earth I believe I’ve been there and back. Glory to God in the highest, I survived. Speaking of God, can you please pause one minute and say thank you to Jesus for me? Thank you. The only reason my sanity is still intact is God.


It wasn’t the work that was wildly more in Osogbo, it was more about the people and the environment than the actual work. Then again, the other half of my class that had rotated though Osogbo first had made a big mess of things for us so all through those 3 weeks there was always that dark cloud of betrayal that hung over us but in hindsight it just might have made us stronger but (I realise I’m saying “but” a lot, forgive me) it also overworked us which made me sick (literarily) by the last week of posting. God is just the best daddy a girl can ask for because the end of posting exam scheduled for that last week got postponed. If not ehn, I don’t know what I would have done. Haha, seems I have jumped to the end of this my posting story without ever beginning. Let’s try again.


From the top;


When we resumed in Osogbo, unlike Ogbomosho where we were spilt into 4 groups, here we were spilt into 5 and then we rotated in the usual fashion. I started with clinics. My first day was at the retroviral clinic and I remember learning absolutely nothing and feeling confused. I’m going to saying this carefully in hopes that none of those involved see this till I graduate from medical school; the residents are always angry at something or someone and they simply do not teach unless they are pushed to the wall or you fall on your face and beg them (except a few) as if they don’t get paid to teach us too in the first place. And ohhh it seems I have forgotten an important(er) story that ought to have come earlier. I’ll still tell it, let’s stick to the residents for now.


I understand that they are overworked, I’m sure that’s their excuse but that’s not an excuse at all. It’s their duty, it’s the whole point of working in a TEACHING hospital. There’s only so much a person can read without guidance from a teacher, especially in clinical medicine where it all about practice and skills. So what if I’ve read the treatment for hypoglycaemia or dehydration a billion times, it might never stick unless I hear someone who has done it at least a hundred times explain it to me or I do it a few times myself. There are just some things medical text can never give you. But no one cares, it really not their business whether or not you get the stuff, or how long it takes you but when it is time to fail you, hesitate, they shall not.


Now to the other story I forgot to share earlier.


Usually every morning in the department there’s a meeting that’s called morning review first thing in the morning. On our first day we attended and unknown to us all, this department had something against phones and tablets and gadgets in general. Unfortunately that morning they seized 2 phones and an iPad. Mind you, not because they were being used by the owners but merely because there were out in the open. Haha. At first I found it funny and thought it was a joke but alas it was no joke at all. They did not return the phones until the end of the week. Imagine the trauma, the people involved were broke, couldn’t communicate with anyone, and the guy who had his iPad seized couldn’t study as much. After that incident everyone kept their gadgets out of sight ALL THE TIME.


Another thing that made this posting gloomy was that I saw children die. You can’t unsee that. There’s no way to talk about it. And of course the failure of the government stares us in the face every day in the health sector. It’s hard not to be furious, but then again most of the time I’m consumed by the idiosyncrasies of my own life, so I quickly forget things like these.


Too often you see parents fail their kids so badly and you imagine for a second if you could just get a gun and blow their brains out, like why wouldn’t you get your child immunized? What is your problem? It is freaking free! If you cannot take care of a child don’t have one.


Paediatrics is draining abeg, in a lot of ways. Honestly, I’m beyond glad it is over.
I ended the posting, apart from getting ill, in ib city to get my beautiful cousin wedded, although I couldn’t celebrate as much as wanted to it was lovely seeing family again.


Thanks for sticking around.


Till next time

Love & love—O

PS: Is there anything you want me to write about?

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